Gradient Fluid

Smile! Big Problems Will Soon Lead to Big Solutions

According to Al Gore and Wired magazine, (remembering that large safety trials do take time) safe vaccines are coming sooner rather than later. After Covid-19 subsides, we will enter what Gore calls "the biggest business and investing opportunity in history."

Gore explained: "The pandemic has demonstrated to us that there is a real collision between the way we've organized the global economy and the natural world. That acknowledgement has accelerated new attitudes…the emergency response, the recovery plans, all of this will drive us toward a better world."
 
"That's what people want, that's very clear."

Many people are concerned that climate change will always take a backseat to the Covid-19 crisis and the civil rights crisis. But Gore doesn't see it as a competition for attention and awareness. He feels these three issues - coronavirus, environmentalism and racial-and-gender inequality - are actually related.


Three points emerge in Wired's conversation with the former Vice President:

  1. Pay more attention to scientists. Realize that the climate scientists are growing ever more dire in their warnings.

  2. Become more empathetic, sensitive and more…'human.'

  3. Acknowledge that the green business opportunity for profits and job creation is sustainable…"It's the way we should go."

How will the green movement intensify? Who does what when? Gore sees the private sector leading the entire trend-wave:


"When business makes a fundamental change, when investors make a fundamental change, when people generally are demanding that fundamental change, then it becomes much more likely that governments will change the policies to facilitate the emergence of this new, more sustainable, more prosperous, fair, healthy, just world. Investors need to respond to the new realities. And businesses already are beginning to respond to this new reality."

Gore wrapped up his dialogue with Wired by emphasizing one more positive trend.
Business culture is changing as Gen Z begins to penetrate the workforce…


"People want to work for a place where they make a good income, but they also want to work for a firm that is helping to make the world a better place. They want to tell their friends and peers and family that it's not just about money; they're helping in a more general way to move the world in the right direction."


This is a summary of an article that was published in Wired, then republished in Medium, an online content curator. Editor Lynn Hinderaker summarized it for NEWbraska.